A Message from Fr Stephen, our Parish Priest

You will find on our website information about our community, our services and how to find our church.  You will see that we are a diverse community with many nationalities represented in our congregations.  All are welcome, and while many of us come from traditional Orthodox countries – Greece, Cyprus, Romania, the Ukraine, Russia etc., many are British people who have found a home in Orthodoxy.  This is a surprise for some and they may be equally surprised that most of our services are conducted in English, because it is our common language.

Orthodoxy is not an exotic near Eastern phenomenon somehow left behind as a residue of the Ottoman Empire.  It is, quite simply “Christianity”! It is the Church founded by Jesus Christ after his Resurrection, which happened in Palestine, in the near East!  Orthodox Christianity is a wonderful religion, full of joy, hope and excitement. Every year we remember the events of Christ’s life, reflect on the meaning and renew ourselves through experiencing these feasts.

Beauty is very important for us, beauty in the icons, beauty in the church buildings, beauty in the singing, beauty in the services.  We enjoy our Orthodoxy and hope that anyone who visits our community will have their minds opened to the ineffable glory and majesty of God, the Holy Trinity.

Orthodox Christianity is not a theoretical religion of books and study (though we do have plenty of books) but it is something that we LIVE and DO.  It affects the whole of our lives and is certainly not confined to Sundays.  Because it is something that we do, it is only by joining in with that “doing” that people can really understand what Orthodoxy is all about.  So, if you are interested “Come and See!”

For Your Diary
19th January 2020
  • Matins / Orthros

    19th January 2020  9:30 am - 10:30 am
    Greek Orthodox Church, Dove Cl, Shrewsbury SY2 6FB, UK

  • Divine Liturgy

    19th January 2020  10:30 am - 12:00 pm
    Greek Orthodox Church, Dove Cl, Shrewsbury SY2 6FB, UK

  • Children’s Catechesis | Varangian Guard Youth Club

    19th January 2020  12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
    SY3 7PY, Rocke St, Shrewsbury SY3 7PY, UK

  • Storytelling: St Seraphim & the bear

    19th January 2020  1:45 pm - 2:45 pm
    Greek Orthodox Church Of The Holy Trinity & St Luke, Magnet Centre, Park Approach, Birmingham B23 7SJ, UK

    Anna Wedlock tells the story of St Seraphim and the Bear, as well as the folktale Ivan the Pea.
    13.45, tickets £10/£5 on the door, refreshments available

22nd January 2020
  • Philoptochos Meeting

    22nd January 2020  10:30 am - 12:30 pm
    45 Hereford Rd, Shrewsbury SY3, UK

  • Orthodox Liturgics Workshop

    22nd January 2020  7:30 pm - 8:30 pm
    45 Hereford Rd, Shrewsbury SY3, UK

23rd January 2020
  • Intercession Service

    23rd January 2020  10:30 am - 11:30 am
    Greek Orthodox Church, Dove Cl, Shrewsbury SY2 6FB, UK

  • Catechetical Study

    23rd January 2020  11:30 am - 12:30 pm
    Greek Orthodox Church, Dove Cl, Shrewsbury SY2 6FB, UK

25th January 2020
  • Great Vespers

    25th January 2020  6:00 pm - 7:00 pm
    Greek Orthodox Church, Dove Cl, Shrewsbury SY2 6FB, UK

26th January 2020
  • Matins / Orthros

    26th January 2020  9:30 am - 10:30 am
    Greek Orthodox Church, Dove Cl, Shrewsbury SY2 6FB, UK

  • Divine Liturgy

    26th January 2020  10:30 am - 12:00 pm
    Greek Orthodox Church, Dove Cl, Shrewsbury SY2 6FB, UK

  • Talk by Mark Buswell on clearing landmines in war-torn countries

    26th January 2020  12:30 pm - 1:30 pm
    Greek Orthodox Church, Dove Cl, Shrewsbury SY2 6FB, UK

29th January 2020
  • Small Paraklesis

    29th January 2020  7:30 pm - 8:30 pm
    Greek Orthodox Church, Dove Cl, Shrewsbury SY2 6FB, UK

30th January 2020
  • Intercession Service

    30th January 2020  10:30 am - 11:30 am
    Greek Orthodox Church, Dove Cl, Shrewsbury SY2 6FB, UK

  • Catechetical Study

    30th January 2020  11:30 am - 12:30 pm
    Greek Orthodox Church, Dove Cl, Shrewsbury SY2 6FB, UK

31st January 2020
  • St Melangell

    31st January 2020

1st February 2020
  • Great Vespers

    1st February 2020  6:00 pm - 7:00 pm
    Greek Orthodox Church, Dove Cl, Shrewsbury SY2 6FB, UK

2nd February 2020
  • Matins / Orthros

    2nd February 2020  9:30 am - 10:30 am
    Barclay Court, Barclay Ct, Donnington, Telford TF2, UK

  • Matins / Orthros

    2nd February 2020  9:30 am - 10:30 am
    Greek Orthodox Church, Dove Cl, Shrewsbury SY2 6FB, UK

  • Divine Liturgy

    2nd February 2020  10:30 am - 12:00 pm
    Greek Orthodox Church, Dove Cl, Shrewsbury SY2 6FB, UK

  • Liturgy for the Presentation of our Lord into the Temple

    2nd February 2020  10:30 am - 12:30 pm
    Greek Orthodox Church, Dove Cl, Shrewsbury SY2 6FB, UK

  • Divine Liturgy in Telford

    2nd February 2020  10:30 am - 12:00 pm
    Barclay Court, Barclay Ct, Donnington, Telford TF2 8AP, UK

  • Children’s Catechesis | Telford

    2nd February 2020  12:30 pm - 1:30 pm
    Barclay Court, Barclay Ct, Donnington, Telford TF2 8AP, UK

3rd February 2020
  • St. Caellainn of Roscommon (6th C). Holy Martyr Ia (Ives) of Cornwall (450). St. Werburgh of Chester, abbess of Hanbury (700). St. Werburgh, abbess of Bardney (ca. 785).

    3rd February 2020

    St Werburgh,

    Also know as Werburgh, Wereburga, Wereburg, Verbourg.

    Benedictine, patroness of Chester, Abbess of Weedon, Trentham, Hanbury, Minster in Sheppy, and Ely, born in Staffordshire early in the seventh century; died at Trentham, 3 February, 699 or 700...

    Her mother was St. Ermenilda, daughter of Ercombert, King of Kent, and St. Sexburga, and her father, Wulfhere, son of Penda the fiercest of the Mercian kings. St. Werburgh thus united in her veins the blood of two very different races: one fiercely cruel and pagan; the other a type of gentle valour and Christian sanctity. In her, likewise, centred the royal blood of all the chief Saxon kings, while her father on the assassination of his elder brother Peada, who had been converted to Christianity, succeeded to the largest kingdom of the heptarchy. Whether Wulfhere was an obstinate pagan who delayed his promised conversion, or a relapsed Christian, is controverted, but the legend of the terrible and unnatural crime which has been imputed to him by some writers must here be dismissed on the authority of all earlier and contemporary chroniclers, as the Bollandists have pointed out. The martyrs, Sts. Wulfald and Ruffin, were not sons of Wulfhere and St. Ermenilda, nor victims of that king's tyranny. Ermenilda at once won the hearts of her subjects, and her zeal bore fruit in the conversion of many of them, while her influence on the passionate character of her husband changed him into a model Christian king. Werburgh inherited her mother's temperament and gifts. On account of her beauty and grace the princess was eagerly sought in marriage, chief among her suitors being Werebode, a headstrong warrior, to whom Wulfhere was much indebted; but the constancy of Werbrugh overcame all obstacles so that at length she obtained her father's consent to enter the Abbey of Ely, which had been founded by her great- aunt, St. Etheldra, and the fame of which was widespread.

    Wulfhere did not long survive his daughter's consecration. On his death, St. Ermenilda took the veil at Ely, where she eventually succeeded her mother, St. Sexburga, as abbess. Kenred, Werburgh's brother, being a mere child at his father's death, his uncle Ethelred succeeded to the throne. This king invited St. Werburgh to assume the direction of all the monasteries of nuns in his dominion, in order that she might bring them to that high level of discipline and perfection which had so often edified him at Ely. The saint with some difficulty consented to sacrifice the seclusion she prized, and undertook the work of reforming the existing Mercian monasteries, and of founding new ones which King Ethelred generously endowed, namely, Trentham and Hanbury, in Staffordshire, and Weedon, in Northamptonshire. It had been the privilege of St. Werburgh to be trained by saints; at home by St. Chad (afterwards Bishop of Lichfield), and by her mother, and in the cloister by her aunt and grandmother. Her position worked no change in the humility which had always characterized her, so that in devotedness to all committed to her care she seemed rather the servant than the mistress. Her sole thought was to excel her sisters in the practice ofreligious perfection. God rewarded her childlike trust by many miracles, which have made St. Werburgh one of the best known and loved of the Saxon saints. That of the stolen goose appealed most to the popular imagination. The story, immortalized in the iconography of St. Werburgh, relates that by a simple command she banished a flock of wild geese that was working havoc in the cornfields of Weedon, and that since then none of these birds has been seen in those parts. She was also endowed with the gifts of prophecy and of reading the secrets of hearts. knowing how devoted her different communities were to her and how each would endeavour to secure the possession of her body after death, she determined to forestall such pious rivalry by choosing Hanbury as her place of burial. But the nuns of the monastery of Trentham determined to keep the remains. They not only refused to deliver them to those who came from Hanbury, but they even locked up the coffin in a crypt and set a guard to watch it. The people of Hanbury sent out anew a large party to make good their claims. Reaching Trentham at midnight all the bolts and bars yielded at their touch, while the guards were overpowered by sleep and knew not that the coffin was being carried to Hanbury.

    So numerous and marvellous were the cures worked at the saint's tomb that in 708 her body was solemnly translated to a more conspicuous place in the church, in the presence of her brother, Kenred, who had now succeeded King Ethelred. In spite of having been nine years in the tomb, the body was intact. So great was the impression made on Kenred that he resolved to resign his crown and followed in his sister's footsteps. In 875, through fear of the Danes and in order to show greater honour to the saint, the body was removed to Chester. The Church of St. Peter and St. Paul, on the site of the present cathedral of Chester, was rededicated to St. Werburgh and St. Oswald, most probably in the reign of Athelstan. The great Leofric, Earl of Mercia (who was likewise styled Earl of Chester), and his wife, Lady Godiva, repaired and enlarged the church, and in 1093, Hugh Lupus, Earl of Chester, richly endowed the abbey and its church. By the instrumentality of this noble, Chester, which had been in the hands of secular canons, became a great Benedictine abbey, the name of St. Anselm, then a monk at Bee, being associated with this transformation. They abbey possessed such immense influence and position that at the time of the suppression under Henry VIII the Earl of Derby was the abbot's seneschal. In the vast wave of iconoclasm that swept over the country in that tyrant's reign the cathedral was sacked by apostates who scattered St. Werburgh's relics. Fragments of the shrine were used as the base of an episcopal throne. Many of the labels and figures had been mutilated, and while restoring them the workmen by mistake placed female heads on male shoulders and vice versa. Only thirty of the original figures remain, four having been lost. Late all these fragments were removed to the west end of the southchoir aisle, where they have been placed nearly in the original position of the shrine, which is 10 feet high.

4th February 2020
  • St. Aldate of Gloucester, hieromartyr (577). St. Modan of Dunbarton, hermit (6th C). St. Liephard, hieromartyr and companion to King Cadwall (690).

    4th February 2020

5th February 2020
  • Holy Martyr Indract of Glastonbury (ca. 710).

    5th February 2020

6th February 2020
  • SS. Mael and Mun, bishops and nephews of St. Patrick (ca. 488).

    6th February 2020

  • Intercession Service

    6th February 2020  10:30 am - 11:30 am
    Greek Orthodox Church, Dove Cl, Shrewsbury SY2 6FB, UK

  • Catechetical Study

    6th February 2020  11:30 am - 12:30 pm
    Greek Orthodox Church, Dove Cl, Shrewsbury SY2 6FB, UK

7th February 2020
  • Holy Martyr Augulus (Aule) of London (303). St. Richard of the West Saxons (720).

    7th February 2020

    St. Richard
    St. Richard of Swabia also known as St. Richard, King of Wessex (Kingdom of the West Saxons) is the brother of St. Boniface. It is uncertain whether or not he was crowned a king in this life, but he is certainly numbered with the "kings and priests" in the Kingdom of Christ.

    St. Richard was the father of Saints Willibald, Winnebald, and Walburga. He and his two sons left England to undertake a pilgrimage of penance and devotion. They made their way through France. Then Richard fell ill and reposed in Lucca, Italy, in 722. He was buried in the Church of St. Frediano. Miracles were reported at his tomb and he became greatly venerated by the citizens of Lucca, who embellished accounts of his life by calling him "king of the English".

    His sons, joined by their sister, were recruited by their uncle, the newly elevated Bishop Boniface of Germany, to evangelize Germany. St. Walburga was the first abbess in Heidenheim. St. Willibald settled in Eichstatt. Some of St. Richard's remains were then translated to Eichstatt, and many there were healed through his intercessions. His connection to Swabia is apparently due to devotion to him after his repose for miracles worked through his intercession.

    Troparion: Tone 3

    Accepting Christ our God as King, O Father Richard, thou didst leave thy native Wessex to be a pilgrim. Pray that in our pilgrimage we may find salvation for our souls.

8th February 2020
  • St. Kegwe of Monmouthshire (6th C). St. Oncho of Clonmore, poet and pilgrim (600). St. Cuthman of Steyning, hermit (8th C). St. Elfleda, abbess of Whitby (714).

    8th February 2020

    St. Cuthman

    He was born around 681 possibly in Devon or Cornwall, or more probably in Chidham near Bosham, about 25 miles from Steyning. His life was one of simple filial piety and charity...

    According to legend, he was a shepherd who had to care for his paralysed mother after his father's death. Due to their poverty, he built a one-wheeled cart or wheelbarrow (with a rope from the handles over his shoulders taking part of the weight) in which he moved her around with him.

    They set out east from his home and, when the rope broke, he made a new one, deciding that if the rope broke again he would take it as a sign from God to stop at that place and build a church. The rope broke at the place now called Steyning. After building a hut to accommodate his mother and himself, he began work on the church (St Andrew's, Steyning). As the church was nearing completion and St Cuthman was having difficulty with a roof-beam, a stranger showed him how to fix it. When Cuthman asked his name, he replied: "I am he in whose name you are building this church." This church was certainly in existence by 857, for we know that King Ethelwulf was buried there in that year.

    Here he died and was buried. King Edward the Confessor handed over responsibility for the Steyning church to the monks of Fécamp in Normandy; they enlarged the church, but took the saint’s remains back to their French abbey to be enshrined. He died at an unknown date in the 8th century. A local cult of his sainthood predates the Norman Conquest.

  • Great Vespers

    8th February 2020  6:00 pm - 7:00 pm
    Greek Orthodox Church, Dove Cl, Shrewsbury SY2 6FB, UK

9th February 2020
  • St. Teilo, bishop of Llandaff and Llandeilo Fawr (6th C). St. Eingan, hermit at Llanengan (6th C).

    9th February 2020
    Llanengan (6th C).

  • Matins / Orthros

    9th February 2020  9:30 am - 10:30 am
    Greek Orthodox Church, Dove Cl, Shrewsbury SY2 6FB, UK

  • Divine Liturgy

    9th February 2020  10:30 am - 12:00 pm
    Greek Orthodox Church, Dove Cl, Shrewsbury SY2 6FB, UK

10th February 2020
  • St. Merewenna, abbess of Romsey (10th C). St. Trumwin, bishop of Abercorn (ca. 704).

    10th February 2020

11th February 2020
  • St. Caedmon of Whitby, monk and hymnographer (ca. 680). St. Gobnait, abbess of Ballyrourney (5th C).

    11th February 2020

12th February 2020
  • St. Ethelwold, monk and bishop of Lindisfarne (740).

    12th February 2020

13th February 2020
  • St. Modomnoc, bishop of Ossory (550). St. Huna of Ely, priest and hermit (690). St. Dyfnog of Clwyd (7th C). St. Ermenhild, abbess of Ely (ca. 700).

    13th February 2020

  • Intercession Service

    13th February 2020  10:30 am - 11:30 am
    Greek Orthodox Church, Dove Cl, Shrewsbury SY2 6FB, UK

  • Catechetical Study

    13th February 2020  11:30 am - 12:30 pm
    Greek Orthodox Church, Dove Cl, Shrewsbury SY2 6FB, UK

14th February 2020
  • St. Conran, bishop of the Orkney Islands.

    14th February 2020

15th February 2020
  • St. Berach of Connaught (5th C). St. Dochow (473). St. Farannan of Allernan (590). St. Oswy, King of Northumbria (670). St. Sigfrid of Glastonbury, Apostle of Sweden (ca. 1045).

    15th February 2020

  • Great Vespers

    15th February 2020  6:00 pm - 7:00 pm
    Greek Orthodox Church, Dove Cl, Shrewsbury SY2 6FB, UK

16th February 2020
  • Matins / Orthros

    16th February 2020  9:30 am - 10:30 am
    Greek Orthodox Church, Dove Cl, Shrewsbury SY2 6FB, UK

  • Divine Liturgy

    16th February 2020  10:30 am - 12:00 pm
    Greek Orthodox Church, Dove Cl, Shrewsbury SY2 6FB, UK

  • Children’s Catechesis | Varangian Guard Youth Club

    16th February 2020  12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
    SY3 7PY, Rocke St, Shrewsbury SY3 7PY, UK

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